Girls Day Out in San Francisco: the California Academy of Sciences and Burma Superstar 

Burmese Cuisine is one of my favourite cuisines in the world. It’s a delectable fusion of Indian, Chinese and Southeast Asian food. The flavours and combinations are absolutely delightful and I highly recommend Burmese food to all hardcore foodies. I’m a little sad that it’s not that popular internationally and a little happy that I’m one of the few people who’s in the know about Asia’s hidden culinary treasure.

Da Dong Roast Duck Restaurant Beijing: a confused tourist and an amused waiter

I sink my teeth into the first wrap. The flavours are far stronger than what I’m used to. The duck is electrifyingly crispy and fatty, the sauce is tangy and sweet and the condiments are confusing. Midway through my first Peking Duck burrito, my waiter magically shows up with a plastic glove and a pair of chopsticks. He looks both mildly concerned and thoroughly amused.

Day 1 in Beijing: first impressions, the Great Firewall and dumplings

I’ve only been in Beijing a couple of hours, but so far, the whole experience has been a bit overwhelming. I can’t blame anyone but myself. I’m a seasoned traveller, I know – but I’m a terrible holiday planner. I’m the kind of person who likes to make things up as I go along; which means that I hadn’t made anything up before I got here. Silly me. 

A Singaporean in Hong Kong: a tiny tale of two sister cities

Growing up, I always loved the sound of Cantonese. To my ears, it sounded like people arguing in style. I admired the direct and no nonsense attitude that Cantonese speakers seem to have. Mess with me and I’ll scold you affectionately. Although Mandarin is the most widely spoken Chinese language in Singapore, those from the older generation still speak dialects like Hokkein and Cantonese. My Mandarin is passable, but I can’t understand a word of the multitude of Chinese dialects that are spoken by Singapore’s largest ethnic group.