Musings of an overseas Indian: adapting Hindu customs for the diaspora

I’ve been a minority my whole life. In Singapore, I’m Indian. In India, I’m Singaporean. In Britain, I’m Asian. In Japan, I’m a gaigokujin. Foreigner. The essence of who I am is truly lost in all the labels that people keep giving me. I went to the National Gallery in Singapore last weekend, and the docent told me – ‘Enjoy the rest of your stay here’. No, the comment did not annoy me. To be honest, I thought it was quite amusing. Our preconceived notions about who and what people are can be startlingly different from the truth. 

Reincarnation and the Bhagavad Gita

Samsara, karma and moksha are three concepts that make up some of the main tenets of Hinduism. Samsara is the belief that all living beings are bound to the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The temporary body – which is born and must die – is the vehicle for the eternal soul. Humans – and other living beings – will continue to participate in this cycle of death and rebirth till moksha or liberation from the cycle of life and death. Moksha is seen by many as the ultimate spiritual goal in Hinduism. As to how one can reach moksha liberation – there are disagreements, even amongst Hindus (and Buddhists) as to how to reach this goal.